RSC featured on Archibus blog for Emergency Preparedness solutions for COVID-19

Watch our interview with ARCHIBUS’s Danielle Moore about our health and safety facilities solutions during COVID-19 (coronavirus).

RSC’s CEO, Bob Stephen, was recently interviewed by ARCHIBUS and featured on their blog about the solutions we have used over the years—and are now applying to the COVID-19 pandemic—to keep employees safe and healthy, reduce organizational costs, and track routine cleaning, medical incidents, remote workers, and more. Watch the interview in the video above. We’ve also summarized it below.

How to track COVID-19 in Archibus.

An image of a woman touching her temple as if not feeling well.
How can organizations quickly and effectively COVID-19 related incidents?

Our clients began looking for immediate incident tracking, or the capability for staff to record whether they weren’t feeling well and what they did about it: did they take the day off or were they exhibiting symptoms of coronavirus that required them to work remotely for a while? Once the initial report is made, we leverage Archibus Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S) to record:

  • who else was involved in the incident.
  • did anyone go to the hospital, and if so, who?
  • did the involved person(s) self-impose quarantine, or was it mandated by an organization?
  • were any medical diagnoses made?

What applications are needed prior to tracking through Environmental Health and Safety?

An image of a laptop, tablet, and smartphone side by side on a wooden table.
Some Archibus applications are necessary prior to tracking with Environmental Health and Safety to leverage correct data.

Before we can take a client into tracking health and safety incidents in EH&S, a couple of applications should be in place so the EH&S application can leverage data and make reporting quicker and easier than it’s ever been. Archibus Space Inventory and Performance and Archibus Personnel and Occupancy hold this essential data:

  • up-to-date floorplans.
  • accurate employee locations.
  • regular data synchronization process (mainly with HR system).
  • room category and type.

Having this data allows maintenance teams to know instantaneously where to go to disinfect or clean a location and contain a health and safety incident. In order to put this information on a work order, work request, or maintenance ticket, and automatically route these to a craftsperson, organizations should have the Archibus Building Operations application.

To determine the condition of a room, building, site, or campus, organizations should use Archibus Commissioning. This application allows users to record whether sites are safe, and, if not, why or how. Is the building defective? Does it need maintenance work? Does new construction need to happen?

Mobile devices and individual contributors in Archibus.

Archibus is fully responsive to enable users with mobile devices, tablets, and handhelds to record data and update the system instantly. These personnel are called individual contributors, and are essential if quick and accurate updates are the goal of an organization.

An image of a hand using a stylus to work a tablet.
Individual contributors can use mobile devices with Archibus to instantly update essential information.

Archibus reporting, metrics, and charts for the middle manager, and C-and V-level executives.

One of the main strengths of Archibus is the ability to report on data. Middle managers can generate monthly, yearly, or quarterly, reports. These reports can also be viewed in the form of metrics. These metrics can help an organization determine how many COVID-related incidents have occurred, as well as how many total incidents. Charts can also be made from reported data: bar charts, line charts, pie charts, and any other visual representation that will make strategic IWMS data digestible.

These reports, when delivered to the C- and V-level decision makers of an organization, can speak for themselves on the effectiveness of IWMS. Reports help guide and inform strategic decisions such as:

  • cost-saving measures.
  • space planning.
  • move management decisions.
  • incident response protocol.
  • routine maintenance and cleaning measures.

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How ARCHIBUS can track and contain Coronavirus (COVID-19) incidents through Environmental Health and Safety

Everyone has been hearing about the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic these past few weeks in the media, at work, and almost everywhere public. Many organizations are taking important health and safety measures in the workplace to prevent any contact with the virus. Some daily workplace safety tips that employees have been encouraged to follow are:

  • work from home.
  • wash hands frequently.
  • limit physical contact with others.
  • use hand sanitizer after coming in contact with others.

With the potential for the coronavirus to spread and affect large numbers of people, RSC offers a way, through ARCHIBUS, to track and contain health and safety incidents. You and your organization can promote health and safety practices in the workplace by providing a forum through which to create and follow a safety improvement plan. This forum is ARCHIBUS’s Environmental and Risk Management domain, which contains the Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S) module. This module is designed with the intent of promoting health and safety measures and practices in the workplace.

A screenshot of the redline feature in ARCHIBUS Environmental Health and Safety with a video symbol to indicate that it is linked to a video tutorial.
Watch a video on how ARCHIBUS Environmental Health and Safety can help your organization isolate, track, and respond to health and safety incidents during the coronavirus.

What is Environmental Health and Safety? Which features can help my organization?

The EH&S module provides facilities professionals with the ability to track workplace incidents, create work requests around incidents, alert employees to precautionary measures being practiced by their organization, and report to any regulatory organizations that need to be notified.

One of ARCHIBUS’s core strengths is that it is designed with inter-connectivity in mind. Inputting data in the initial “Report an Incident” feature within ARCHIBUS EH&S will lead the user to more detailed views and actions, like automatically filling out OSHA forms, generating a service request ticket, or updating the medical monitoring status for an employee. In this way, your organization can put an emphasis on workplace safety and safety management, keeping employees healthy and at ease.

Report an Incident

Show the importance of health and safety in the workplace, and report general details of a health or safety incident. Track the date, where it took place, and who was involved: this can include employees and non-employees, such as delivery people, visitors, animals, etc. Users can also identify the incident category. Categories can be as general or specific as your organization chooses; for this example, we used the “coronavirus” incident type, which is quite specific. Users can also provide an incident description, such as “showing signs of the coronavirus”, or “diagnosed with the coronavirus”.

The report form is simple and straight-forward and is intended to lead users into more detailed actions in the module, mostly under the “Track Incident” feature.

A screenshot of the Report an Incident form in ARCHIBUS Environmental Health and Safety.
ARCHIBUS Environmental Health and Safety “Report an incident” form. Associate employees and non-employees, locations, date, and incident type.

Track Incidents

The “Track Incident” feature uses the general information from the “Report an Incident” form to take the report to a greater level of detail through various views. It also allows users to take important action within their organization’s workplace safety management plan. Some particularly useful actions are:

  • viewing incident details initially entered in the report.
  • redlining the location of the incident.
  • generating a service request.
  • entering any medical responses to the incident.
  • filling out and attaching documents associated with the incident, such as OSHA forms.

This is an especially useful feature for managers who will be overseeing incident responses, preventive measures, and aftermath procedures.

Incident Details

This displays the initial details of the incident from the incident report.

A screenshot of the Incident Details view in ARCHIBUS Environmental Health and Safety.
View the initial incident details that were entered in the incident report in ARCHIBUS Environmental Health and Safety.

Site Information

See where the incident took place, and, if necessary, indicate the location with a redline on your organization’s drawings so others, such as craftspeople, janitorial staff, managers, and employees, can view its location. Users may submit the redlined drawing as an incident document so it appears with other attached documents. Follow environmental health and safety guidelines by maintaining clean facilities that are up to standards.

A screenshot of the redlining capabilities  in ARCHIBUS Environmental Health and Safety.
ARCHIBUS Environmental Health and Safety allows facilities professionals to redline on their organization’s drawings where the incident took place so craftspeople, janitors, and other employees are aware and can properly execute their roles.

Medical Information

Enter and track any medical information, such as whether anyone was admitted to the emergency room or hospital, which facility they went to, who their attending physician was, and any medical results, such as full recovery, still recovering, or death. Further medical monitoring is possible under “Incident Response”.

A screenshot of the Medical Information feature in ARCHIBUS Environmental Health and Safety.
Input any important medical information related to the incident in ARCHIBUS Environmental Health and Safety, such as whether the associated person(s) went to the hospital or emergency room, which medical facility they went to, and who was the attending physician.

Incident Response

Located under “Track Incidents”, “Incident Response” is an essential step in the incident reporting process. From this view, several important actions can be taken, such as generating a service request ticket, additional medical monitoring, and assigning work restrictions. This is arguably one of the most important features in ARCHIBUS Environmental Health and Safety.

Maintenance Requests and Tickets

An essential step in any hazard management program is maintaining clean and regulated facilities. From the incident response view, users can generate a service or maintenance request ticket that automatically associates itself with the location and incident category/type entered in the incident report.

A screenshot of the Generate Service Request option in Incident Response in ARCHIBUS Environmental Health and Safety.
Generate a service request from the location information already input in the “Report an Incident” form in ARCHIBUS Environmental Health and Safety.
A screenshot of a generated service request, leveraging location data, in ARCHIBUS Environmental Health and Safety.
Create a Service Request in ARCHIBUS Environmental Health and Safety.

Medical Monitoring

Additional medical monitoring in EH&S can promote safety awareness and lets users input and track how long someone will be monitored, assigns a tracking number, and update the status of the individual or any test results that may be pending.

A screenshot of the Medical Monitoring view in ARCHIBUS Environmental Health and Safety.
Assign a time period to and regularly update a medical monitoring status in ARCHIBUS Environmental Health and Safety.

Work Restrictions

 

Assign special work restrictions to individuals, such as “working from home” in the case of the coronavirus. Set a time period for the restriction, track how many workdays were lost, and determine whether the restriction is temporary or permanent. Help everyone how to improve safety awareness in the workplace.

A screenshot of the Work Restrictions feature under Incident Response in ARCHIBUS Environmental Health and Safety.
Record and apply any temporary or permanent work restrictions to employees associated with the incident in ARCHIBUS Environmental Health and Safety.

Employee Training

Assign a training program to an employee or employees to strengthen your organization’s workplace safety program. In the case of the coronavirus, users may wish to assign an employee a hand-washing class, a hygienic-practices-while-sick class, or provide a program to teach people best practices to prevent to sickness. Record when the training was completed. Help employees learn how to create a safe and healthy workplace.

A screenshot of the Employee Training feature under Incident Response in ARCHIBUS Environmental Health and Safety.
Assign a training program or class to employees and record when the program was completed in ARCHIBUS Environmental Health and Safety.

Metrics

Create metrics that will appear on your Environmental Health and Safety dashboard around any statistics or data your organization desires to track. Show, with real data, the importance of health and safety in the workplace. This could be days of work lost, employees who are working from home, how many cases of the coronavirus have occurred within the organization, and much more. Help decision makers learn how to improve health and safety performance by creating alerts that will send out emails or notifications to key people or the entire organization. Metrics and alerts are completely customizable to each organization.

Incidents Map

View a global portfolio on an interactive map of where and how many times incidents of the same type have occurred.

A screenshot of the world map view in ARCHIBUS Environmental Health and Safety.
Track the global occurrence of incidents with a map view in ARCHIBUS Environmental Health and Safety.

Incidents Log and Pre-formatted OSHA Reports

Under the Incidents Log, users can leverage the data already entered for an incident to automatically fill in an OSHA report form, utilizing the role of the government in industrial safety.

A screenshot of an automatically filled OSHA report in ARCHIBUS Environmental Health and Safety.
Generate automatically filled OSHA reports from the data previously entered in an incident report in ARCHIBUS Environmental Health and Safety.

RSC has seen great success from our clients using this module, and we hope that your organization, too, can discover how to improve health and safety in the workplace by leveraging the powerful features in the ARCHIBUS Environmental Health & Safety module. If you have more questions, we are available to demo the software. Contact us to find out more about the EH&S module, find ideas to promote safety in the workplace, and bring your organization’s work environment to full health!


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6 Ways to Change a Business Culture: Pt. 2 — Get Out of the Way

One morning I woke up and realized that I was not happy with my job. I had great staff and great clients, but I was miserable. I have always had a running promise with myself that if I was not happy with my job, I would quit and get a new one. Unfortunately, I couldn’t do that because I was the CEO and owner of the company, and I had staff that were counting on me.

I contacted one of my business consultants and told him about the situation. He counseled me to hire an HR consultant. This didn’t make any sense to me because I didn’t have any problems with my staff. I decided to take his advice and hire one, though. This transition eventually led me to the CEO mentoring program, Vistage, which we talk about in other articles.

Foundation

One of the first suggestions the HR consultant recommended was to make an Org Chart. An Org Chart is an organizational tool that allows people to see the flow of a company, roles of staff, and many other aspects of a company’s work-flow. By displaying this in a visual format, one can see what is effective and where there are holes in an organization. Once again, I was confused by this suggestion — at the time there were only 15 of us in the company, and I felt that I knew exactly what was going on and who was in charge of what at all times. 

I did it anyways, and it became one of the best decisions for my company. Not only did it allow me to understand much more clearly what was happening in the company and what everyone’s assignments were, it also allowed me to communicate better with my staff, plan for future roles, and identify deficiencies. In addition, it allowed my staff and me to grow and become even more effective than before.

The second suggestion from the HR consultant was to create a RACI document, RACI being an acronym for Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, and Informed. This document’s purpose is to improve communication within a collaborative team. Every person within the team should be assigned a role from the acronym RACI. “Understanding Responsibility Assignment Matrix (RACI Matrix)” by Cara Doglione provides a simple example for understanding how this works:

“John is developing software feature X that will be integrated with software feature Y – developed by Jess. Mike is the project manager and Irina is in marketing. For feature X, John is responsible, Mike is accountable, and Jess needs to be consulted with as her feature will integrate with John’s. Lastly, Irina simply needs to be informed when the task is complete.”

Both the Org Chart and the RACI document began to organize the company in a way so that I was able to more fully understand the strengths and weaknesses of my staff as a whole and of each individual.

These two documents stimulated new goals for me and created a path to focus my energy. This focus rejuvenated me, therefore bringing new energy to the company.

Shadow Leadership

Once I had the organization in place, the HR consultant gave me one my most difficult challenges: to shut my mouth when my employees are trying to accomplish tasks.

I fought this principle at first because my thinking was such: I had built this company from the bottom up, I knew more about the application than anyone else, and I knew exactly what to do because I had done it before. Why would I shut my mouth and not tell my staff exactly what they needed to do?

She told me very clearly that I was stifling my staff. She explained that I was taking away their ability to contribute effectively by not allowing them to go through their own processes to reach conclusions, no matter how quickly or slowly that process may be, nor how many steps it may take them. I had to become the type of boss that could give his staff a task and trust that they would accomplish the desired results, even though they may use a different process than I would have chosen to achieve those results. Once I did this, the results were marvelous.

Putting This Principle Into Practice

A few months after I learned the above principles, one of our clients wanted to install a way-finding application. I scheduled a meeting with two of my staff to explain the project, then shut my mouth and let them figure out the best way to accomplish the task. The direction of the conversation was not going where I desired within the first ten minutes. Still, I persisted in my resolution to shut my mouth, giving only a couple of guiding comments as was necessary, and, 45 minutes later, they reached the conclusion that I thought was best. It was amazing and eye-opening to see this kind of result and growth, both in myself and my staff.

I returned to my HR consultant and shared the experience with her. She was happy to hear my results, then finished explaining this principle to me: people must be allowed to work at their own pace. Some individuals can complete a task in 15 steps, while others may take three to complete the same task. Everyone thinks differently and has their own way of completing projects, and, as a boss, I have the responsibility of not getting in the way of that process so productivity can flourish.

This is a process.

Putting this into practice, like many principles discussed in our blog, is a learning process. It takes mental effort and active choice to implement this attitude and action, but the results are well worth the effort.


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Bob Stephen’s Top 10 Business Books: #2 “Change Your Questions, Change Your Life”

I reference Marilee Adams’ book Change Your Questions, Change Your Life all the time. It has helped me immensely in my communication in the business world, because I have been able to strengthen my relationships with people.

It’s written in a narrative format, following the story of a man who has been having challenges at work and, because of that, decides that he wants to resign. He is counseled to talk to someone about his challenges before stepping away from the job. His journey and solutions are insightful, as he discovers that there are two different approaches to every situation: judging and learning.

Judger

We as humans beings naturally see things from our perspective. We want to judge situations and events according to how they line up to the world we’ve built for ourselves. Applying a single-viewed approach to any situation can lead to judging it incorrectly and reaching false conclusions, instead of asking questions to better understand why people act the way they do, why a problem was handled a certain way, or why the desired results are not being realized.

How I’ve Applied This Approach

One of my responsibilities outside of work includes participating in a board of members that handles travel and finances for a local organization. The communication style is such that members are constantly pointing their fingers at each other and trying to find  fault with one another for any problems that arise. I eventually decided to resign because the amount of exercise and energy it took for me to stay on the choice chart was overwhelming, and for my own personal growth, I chose to resign because I did not want to fall into the Judger Pit.

Learner

When we discount our tendency to jump to conclusions, and decide instead to ask questions that will help us better understand, some difficult and stressful situations will become experiences that allow us to level with people and strengthen relationships.

How I’ve Applied This Approach

A few years ago, a client of mine needed some help with the application my business provides. I chose a bright, quick employee, that I trusted would get the job done, to call the client and figure out what needed to be done. A few weeks later, my CFO came to me and said that this employee had used company time and money to fly to the client, book a hotel room, and pay for meals. I was confused and felt betrayed, because to my knowledge, the task would only have taken a phone call and a couple of hours.

I decided to apply the asking questions approach, instead of my usual approach that would lead to anger. I called the employee and asked what I hadn’t explained well about the assignment. The employee then recounted to me that he had called the client and realized that the task was not one, but multiple tasks, and that the client had authorized to pay for everything.

I am so glad that I asked instead of just getting angry. I understood the situation much better now, and I could see the logic behind the employees’ choices.

“Switching Lane”: Moving from Judger to Learner

Beginning to process an event as a judger does not mean that you will be limited to viewing things from a single perspective. The “Choice Map” allows us to see that there are different paths we all choose to take when tackling difficult situations. We can choose half-way through an event to see things as a learner.

How I’ve Applied This Approach

I have had many experiences when I think I am explaining something very well, and notice negative reactions, or at least reactions that are contrary to what I expected. I take those opportunities to switch from a judger to a learner and ask questions that will help everyone to feel closer and strengthened. I try to apply this in our Tech and Staff Meetings. I oftentimes will have to ask for clarification and/or other questions so I can understand better and help my staff become more unified.

Learning This Approach Is a Process

We all naturally want to approach events and situations from a judger perspective. Honing the skills necessary to become a learner instead of a judger is a lifelong process. Consistently choosing to change your approach to situations will help with this process, but it is choice.


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The Intelligence Cycle & IWMS

The Intelligence Cycle and an Integrated Work Management System have a lot more in common than you might think.  Thanks to IWMS Daily, we came across this amazing article entitled “6 Aspects of Military Intelligence & How They Relate to IWMS.”  After reading the article, we felt inspired to look a little more deeply into the relationship.  The article you are about to read is a mix of Military, Department of Defense, FBI, and CIA definitions of their intelligence Cycle as well as input from the article that inspired us with a bit of RSC flair.

We are grateful for the service provided by all the men and women enlisted to protect the freedoms the USA was founded on.  In honor of Independence Day and all those who gave their lives serving in defense of the freedoms our great Country was founded upon, we wanted to share something that bridged the two worlds.

The intelligence cycle is a term used by various government agencies including the military, FBI, and CIA to name a few.  It is “the process of developing unrefined data into polished intelligence for the use of policymakers”1 and consists of six interrelated operations 2.  The process is circular in nature and fundamental for processing data in civilian, military, or law enforcement system.

 

As outlined in the article, we present to you the six parts of the intelligence cycle and how they relate to IWMS

1. Planning and Direction

Intelligence requirements are determined by a decision maker to meet certain goals 3. As in the military a good IWMS must have a situational awareness of all available resources as well as the means to quantify them.  It requires charting a direction which identifies the resources needed to attain a particular goal. In the FM world this can be thought of as improving the allocation and prioritization of real estate operations and more rapid development as well as investing in technology or replacing older RE/FM systems 4.  At Robert Stephen Consulting, LLC., we strive to listen to our client’s needs and desires as we help in the planning process. We provide flexible guides to assist clients decipher what is most important.

2. Collection

Collection is the gathering of raw information based on requirements determined in planning and direction 5.Data collection is done in either a strategical or tactical way in order to connect seemingly unrelated information to produce a holistic and comprehensive understanding of a certain goal.  In an IWMS these data sources may consist of occupancy, costs, leasing, future space requirements, operational maintenance management (scheduling repairs), customer satisfaction, project management, etc. 6.  RSC aids in collecting electronic information and standards along with manufacture recommendations.  We also provide best practices along the way.

3. Processing & Exploitation

Defined by the US Department of Defense as “the conversion of information into suitable forms” 7.Corporate leadership, like their military counterparts, require data to be fully analyzed and vetted in order to make rapid strategic decisions on the appropriate (daily) course of action.  The processing of collected data facilitates improved customer experience, reputation management, and building
partnerships among others — all of which impact a company’s bottom line. Some outcomes of processing and exploitation in IWMS include work order processing, energy management, and environmental impact 8.  After gathering data, we synthesize and consult.  We create a pilot project including sample data from 1-3 buildings and multiple floors with employee information, assets, etc.  We prove the theory hypothesized from the collected data.

4. Analysis and Production

In the military, analysis and production fuses processed data from various sources together into a centralized report to identify potential patterns 9/10.An IWMS does the same thing.  The goal of the IWMS, however, is to improve management of (Corporate) Real Estate/Facilities Management. Aspects of this goal include flexibility to expand future applications/utility, reporting, financial management, market planning, site selection, transaction management, lease management, operations/maintenance, sustainability, energy management, and business intelligence to name a few 11.  After analyzing the data, RSC puts together a punch list of items and is reviewed with the client and any remaining data is uploaded.

5. Dissemination and Integration

The military defines dissemination and integration as the delivery of intelligence to users in a suitable form applicable to appropriate missions, tasks, and functions 12 in the form of reports 13 on either the front lines or in higher leadership levels.  This is done through various types of communication (e.g., social media, mobile devices, the “cloud,” and database transfers).  The dissemination (sharing or broadcasting) of information is not the end of a process, but a continuous link between the producers and consumers of data.  An IWMS integrates BIM, CAD, and GIS intelligence and delivers the data to users (some of which may include Client Service Directors, Human Resource Directors, & Marketing Directors) through dashboards, mapping displays, analytics, mobile applications 14, and RSC’s very own Space View.  At this point staff is introduced to the new process and training to use the system.  Minor tweaks are also considered and incorporated when they follow the plan and process outlined in items 1-4 above.

6. Evaluation and Feedback

Evaluation and feedback is a continuous assessment of intelligence operations to ensure requirements are being met 15. This military practice assists in planning, collection, processing, executing, and making overall improvements.  In corporate environments this process translates into consulting and honestly identifying any deficiencies with the system 16.  At Robert Stephen Consulting, LLC., we understand that these applications are living and breathing systems which require constant feeding and growth.  An internal champion makes decisions on whether enhancements need to be made to a new or existing IWMS by gauging system performance and efficiency. There’s no wonder why RSC believes an internal champion is key to a successful IWMS integration.  It’s a tried and true concept that even the US Government uses.

When these six military intelligence cycles are applied, the benefits of IWMS are clear.  An Integrated Work Management System reduces costs, increases efficiency, and improves productivity.  If your company is not already using an IWMS, like ARCHIBUS, we urge you to do the research, ask questions, and invest!  The benefits an IWMS can bring to your company, no matter how large or small, are innumerable.

With that being said, we hope you have a happy, festive, and safe Fourth of July!

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6 Ways to Change a Business Culture: Pt. 1, Set a Vision

One night, as I was driving through the mountains, it started snowing.  Driving conditions went downhill quick as the storm progressed to a full-out skier’s dream blizzard.  Powder stacked up fast – both on the road and on my windshield.  Thankfully, I was able to pull behind a snowplow.  By keeping my sights on that vehicle’s lights, I was able to (very slowly!) reach my destination.

Running a business can feel like driving through a blizzard sometimes.  If you can’t see where you’re going, it’s hard to set your tires on the right course.  At least, unless there’s a snowplow to follow.  Thankfully, there are 3 easy steps to make sure your business is on track.

3 Easy Steps to Set a Vision and Align your Company

Paint Your Picture

Learning how to use the Painted Picture concept is absolutely vital to setting up your vision.  In fact, it has to happen first.  I highly recommend you read our earlier post regarding a painted picture before finishing this article.

In any case, you have to be able to describe where you are and where you’re going if you want people to join you on the journey.  Even if it’s just you, you need to know where you’re going so that you don’t get lost on the way there.

Develop Core Values

Once you know where you’re going, you need to know how you’re getting there.  You need to know your core values.  For ours, we use the acronym TIPS: Transparency, Integrity, Professionalism, and Straightforwardness.

While you don’t have to use an acronym, you will want to create your own set of core values. We have chosen to use an acronym to assist with memorization.  Core values help align current and future staff to the same path so we can move forward together.  Nobody wonders where we’re going, how we’ll get there, or what creates success.  We already know, because we can fall back on those core values to keep us aligned and unified.

Answer: Why, How, and What?

Once you know where you’re going and how to get there, you’ve only got to ask yourself three more questions.

• “Why?”
• “How?”
• “What?”

We follow Simon Senik’s adage to answer these three questions.

  • Why: We are passionate about meeting the needs of our clients by providing state of the art, easy to use, and modern IWMS solutions.
  • How: We study technologies, review and assess for applicability, and work to embrace and incorporate the appropriate solutions.
  • What: We provide the results for medium to large companies to help manage their assets through Fast, Efficient, Professional IWMS Tools and Consulting.

By answering these question we align our team. Gone are the days where our team struggles with direction or clarity.  Instead, we’re able to quickly discuss Why, How, and What we are doing and gain consensus.  Because of these questions we know why we need to get this done, how we are going to do this, and finally, what we are doing.


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Bob Stephen’s Top 10 Business Books: #1 “Delivering Happiness”

This is part 1 of a 10 part series by RSC’s CEO & Managing Director, Bob Stephen. In this series, Bob discusses the top 10 business books in his library.

Why every CEO should read “Delivering Happiness”

First, let me ask you a few questions: What is the value of joy in your work? How much does it matter that you, your employees, and your customer’s are happy? Why is it that the amount of money one makes tends to have a negative correlation with how happy they are? If you’ve ever found yourself thinking along these lines, then it is imperative you read Tony Hsieh’s book, “Delivering Happiness.”

Hsieh is the well-known entrepreneur and current CEO of Zappos. In
“Delivering Happiness,” Hsieh discusses a few of his highly successful
and profitable business ventures. More specifically he discusses the
impact those businesses had on his overall happiness. When the time came
to sell, he could have made exponentially more than the millions he did
– but the money didn’t matter to him. He was completely and entirely
unhappy.

Building Your Own Happiness

Hsieh founded Zappos on one essential principle: happiness. He made the key decision to surround himself with energetic, enthusiastic, likeable, and service-oriented people who in turn helped him create a positive
and uplifting culture. The organization developed a set of core values that created an atmosphere of optimism and success. Hsieh made sure that every employee knew they were a valued member of the team.

Sharing Your Happiness

It really stuck with me the importance Hsieh put on an internal culture
of happiness and positivity. But what caught my attention even more, is
his desire to share that happiness.

As the company grew, that happiness Hsieh worked so hard to establish
spilled beyond the doors of the organization. They shared that same
positivity to their clients through their customer service.

There are a plethora of service oriented professions who don’t hold themselves to the same standards Hsieh established at Zappos. For example: In the book Hsieh shares a story about a particular customer. This customer came back to their hotel late one night and called into room service for a pizza. The hotel staff quickly informed them that
their kitchen was closed for the evening and they could not fulfill the
request. The customer responded asking the hotel employee to promptly
call Zappos and have them send him a pizza. Exasperated, the hotel
employee followed through with the request. To her amazement, the
customer service representative at Zappo’s got their location, and
reported back with 5 pizza delivery services that were open and would
deliver directly to the hotel room and asked what type of pizza they
would like.

Happiness Delivered

My point in sharing all this is that both the traveler and hotel
employee are now loyal Zappo’s customers. Because Hsieh built his
business on the principles of happiness and delivering joy to his
customers, he is wildly successful. But his success exceeds the numbers
on his paycheck. The true success of Zappos is the happiness and the
satisfaction Hsieh now has in his job.

What it boils down to is this: When you are happy, your staff is happy.
When your staff is happy, your clients are happy. This cycle of
happiness creates an atmosphere of productivity. People who love their
job work hard at it. When they work hard they get more work done and do
their jobs better.

I highly recommend this book and I urge you to add it to your
library. Hsieh was able to put into words something I have been
searching to describe throughout my entire business career. We all want
to provide that level of customer service. We all want to love where we
work, what we do, and be able to deliver a product or service that
changes other’s lives for the better.


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5 Things a CEO Can Learn From Vistage: Pt. 1 — Becoming a Confident Leader

This week we are excited to bring to you a part 1 of a new series on The Five Things a CEO Can Learn From Vistage: Becoming a Confident Leader

Several years ago, I found myself extremely frustrated.  It didn’t seem as though I was getting the results I wanted from my staff.  After expressing this irritation and disappointment to the head of Human Resources, she recommended I join Vistage. Vistage is a premiere CEO coaching group.  After looking into it, I figured it was worth a shot.
After joining the program, I quickly felt weights being lifted. Things got clearer, easier, and better.  I felt as though I’d gone from navigating vicious, stormy seas in a tiny boat to sailing on a calm, serene lake.  About six months into coaching, Lance Descourouez asked me a life changing question:

Are You an Accomplished Leader?

“Bob,” he posed, “Do you consider yourself to be an accomplished CEO?”

My immediate, gut reaction was an emphatic, “No.” Lance prompted me to think more deeply about his question, but even after several minutes, my answer remained the same.  No, I did not feel like an accomplished CEO. Thankfully, Lance provided some follow up questions, sparking an epiphany. He asked:

 

    1. How long have you been in business?

At the time, it was 14 years.

    1. What’s your yearly revenue?

It was well north of seven figures.

    1. How many people do you employ?

There were 15-16 people on payroll at the time.

    1. Has the business survived any recessions?

Two, actually.

Lance then repeated his initial question: “Bob, do you consider yourself to be an accomplished CEO?”

Confidence Is Key

I’d been so busy looking at my goals that I’d neglected to look at the journey. I couldn’t see the forest through the trees. I couldn’t see that I was, in fact, a successful CEO. I accomplished more in those 14 years than most others do in a lifetime.

Then it hit me – I’d lost my confidence. That interaction helped restore it as well as my sense of direction. The transformation from uncertain and doubting to a fearless, self assured CEO was drastic. I felt like a caterpillar breaking free from my chrysalis.

Now, my purpose in telling the story is this: every leader has these kinds of doubts at one time or another. It is normal. But it is vital not to let those doubts break you or weigh you down.Confident and accomplished leaders are born by remembering who we are, where we were, and how far we’ve come.

That is why, as leaders, we need the support of good friends and coaches to help us keep our minds in the game. We need people who can help us own-up to our fears, answer the hard questions, and move forward with direction. We need people who’ve been there before, so they can help guide us through the dark times. Vistage is that support group.


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Conversations with Bob: Why is it important to invest in IWMS?

Megan: Why is there a need for an IWMS system and what you provide?

Bob: It’s really an infant application. It’s not like accounting or architecture that have been around for decades or centuries. It’s only been around for about 35 years. What happens is when a company gets to about 2,000 employees, they begin to lose track of things. So their strategic planning, their acquisition, or reduction is very difficult for them to understand. What this system does is it allows you to graphically show your occupancy, your vacancy, where your division and departments are, your organizational breakdown visually on a floorplan, and it is live against a database so you can do some very good strategic reports. The beginning claim to fame is helping these companies to make these strategic decisions as they are growing or reducing at about 2,000 employees or greater. Now we have some companies that have about 60,000 employees, 30,000, 20,000, even 10,000, but 2,000 is the break.

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Friday Training Follow Up: AutoCAD – BOMA Polylining

Robert Stephen Consulting, LLC provides free 30-minute Client Training session every Friday at 10:00AM PST!  RSC prides itself in providing learning opportunities for our clients.  We feel that if our clients know the system better, we will able to work better with them to discover and implement the solutions that they need.

Last week Matt Ritzman led our Client Training on AutoCAD Basics: BOMA Polylining. Below is the outline of the training:

Polylines to BOMA Standards

Polylines are derived from lines and arcs. My favorite AutoCAD tools that help to create polylines are the following:
LINE
ARC
OSNAP
Object Snap Tracking – also TRA
PLINE
BPOLY
PEDIT
JOIN

Developing an understanding of the available tools and their quirks allows you to create your polylines much more efficiently.

BOMA Standards

BOMA = Building Office Managers Association
The purpose of BOMA standards is to assign spaces in a way that all owners and lessors can agree on the area that is being used.  BOMA is concerned about relationships between owners and renters.  This means that these standards don’t account for areas within a rented space.  That is to say, BOMA doesn’t care how you polyline a cubicle or a desk.  There are other standards that are less concerned about exact measurements that are worth knowing about:
NBSAP = National Business Space Assignment Policy from the GSA (General Services Administration)
Used by government.  This is concerned with how space is defined on a much more granular level than BOMA.   But less concerned with exact measurements of space.
FICM = Facilities Inventory and Classification Manual
Used by Education.  This is similar to the NBSAP, in that it focuses on Space.

Categories and Types

The area measuring standards allow you to be confident about the space that you occupy.
– It gives you the ability to negotiate with your renters or the landlord according to facts rather than estimations.
– It allows you to report consistently on space categories, types, uses, and standards.

If you’d like to know more about this particular training, email us at training@rsc2lc.com

We’d love to have you join us for our next on System Administration, specifically Schema Changes on Friday, January 8th.

Please register by clicking on this link and follow the instructions:

Registering is required to receive a confirmation email and a link to the training.
Our weekly client trainings are held Fridays from 10:00 AM to 10:30 AM PST.  This is an opportunity to learn more about an area of ARCHIBUS that you may not be familiar with.
We look forward to seeing you there!

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