6 Ways to Change a Business Culture: Pt. 1, Set a Vision

One night, as I was driving through the mountains, it started snowing.  Driving conditions went downhill quick as the storm progressed to a full-out skier’s dream blizzard.  Powder stacked up fast – both on the road and on my windshield.  Thankfully, I was able to pull behind a snowplow.  By keeping my sights on that vehicle’s lights, I was able to (very slowly!) reach my destination.

Running a business can feel like driving through a blizzard sometimes.  If you can’t see where you’re going, it’s hard to set your tires on the right course.  At least, unless there’s a snowplow to follow.  Thankfully, there are 3 easy steps to make sure your business is on track.

3 Easy Steps to Set a Vision and Align your Company

Paint Your Picture

Learning how to use the Painted Picture concept is absolutely vital to setting up your vision.  In fact, it has to happen first.  I highly recommend you read our earlier post regarding a painted picture before finishing this article.

In any case, you have to be able to describe where you are and where you’re going if you want people to join you on the journey.  Even if it’s just you, you need to know where you’re going so that you don’t get lost on the way there.

Develop Core Values

Once you know where you’re going, you need to know how you’re getting there.  You need to know your core values.  For ours, we use the acronym TIPS: Transparency, Integrity, Professionalism, and Straightforwardness.

While you don’t have to use an acronym, you will want to create your own set of core values. We have chosen to use an acronym to assist with memorization.  Core values help align current and future staff to the same path so we can move forward together.  Nobody wonders where we’re going, how we’ll get there, or what creates success.  We already know, because we can fall back on those core values to keep us aligned and unified.

Answer: Why, How, and What?

Once you know where you’re going and how to get there, you’ve only got to ask yourself three more questions.

• “Why?”
• “How?”
• “What?”

We follow Simon Senik’s adage to answer these three questions.

  • Why: We are passionate about meeting the needs of our clients by providing state of the art, easy to use, and modern IWMS solutions.
  • How: We study technologies, review and assess for applicability, and work to embrace and incorporate the appropriate solutions.
  • What: We provide the results for medium to large companies to help manage their assets through Fast, Efficient, Professional IWMS Tools and Consulting.

By answering these question we align our team. Gone are the days where our team struggles with direction or clarity.  Instead, we’re able to quickly discuss Why, How, and What we are doing and gain consensus.  Because of these questions we know why we need to get this done, how we are going to do this, and finally, what we are doing.


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Conversations With Bob: What to Consider When Selecting an IWMS?

Transcript:

Bob: One of my first speak to’s is I have a pie chart that talks about the implementation of technology. When we’re asked to go in and demonstrate an IWMS system, the client says, “Let us see the technology. We want it to go live. We want to touch it. We want to feel it.” Over the 20 years that I have been consulting in this area, I’ve come to realize that the company is focusing on the technology, and they’re almost ignoring the two larger components of technology installation, which are the business process and the relationship arena. What I mean by that is I can look at a technology: an iphone app, or an IWMS system on a laptop or a tablet and I can see that yes, it is a work order, or yes it does a lease management, yes I can track space. What the company is not asking is, “Does the workflow process in an IWMS system match our business process?” So, for example, if you have a work order system that requires a dispatcher to review it before they actually assign it, then from the assignment to have an estimate, then an approvement, then to send it to the shop lead who assigns it to the crafts person to go complete the work, then the dispatcher reviews it again, and then it goes back to finance – if that’s your work flow, but the IWMS system you’re looking at is very simplified and it only does work order to craftsperson to completion, then that’s a disconnect, and you may be spending a lot of money on an application that doesn’t meet your business process. On the converse side of that, if you have an IWMS system which is showing you all these things and you’re not doing one of those steps, you go, “Well, that’s a good idea, we never thought about that.” The IWMS system could bring a business process to light that may help you make strategic decisions.

Going back to your original question, why did we choose ARCHIBUS? ARCHIBUS has the ability to make it as simple as “request, crafts person, complete” or as complicated as “request, review, dispatch, estimate, approve, shoplead, workteam, craftsperson, complete, close, financial”, and anything in between, because of its flexibility. The business process is huge, and how to accomplish things. Can the system mold to your business process, or do you have to mold to the software? Hopefully you don’t have to mold to the software.

The one that’s almost more important than that is the relationship arena. The relationship arena is very real. Some people may consider it a negative thing, I don’t. It’s actually a very positive thing. If I’m trying to get an HR system load, in other words, if I’m trying to get the employees from HR, and HR goes, “Why would I want to give you that data? I don’t want to give you how much people make and what their W- 2 exemptions are and their social security number.” We would say, “Well we’re not asking for that. All we need is employee information, employee’s first name, last name, employee ID number, perhaps their phone number and where they work.” They’re going to go, “Why would I create extra work for myself?” So we have to then have a relationship where there are two departments going, “Well, look, if you give us employee data we can give you back on a real time, where these people actually work.” So if you help us, we can help you. That takes a champion, as we talked about in one of our articles. It takes a champion to work through those two departments to get that connection. That’s called relationship arena. Or, let’s say that the finance department doesn’t get along very well with the corporate real estate for some reason. There needs to be a champion there to help see the benefit on both sides.

I consider the business process 40% of the implementation, and the relationship arena 40%. Technology is really only 20%. We can probably install an IWMS system, if everything went well, in only four hours. The real reason it takes several weeks, or a month, is we have IT involved, they have to make sure it fits their structure, we have to make sure that all the security measures are in place, it just takes a lot of “make sure everybody’s got everything in a line”.


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Three SQL Tips to make ARCHIBUS View Development easier

My name is Todd Forsyth.  I’m the Technical Lead at RSC LLC.  We specialize in installing, hosting and managing ARCHIBUS CAFM/IWMS systems.  This is one of a series of posts on how to make that process easier if you’re doing something similar yourself.

If you’ve done much ARCHIBUS customization, you know that the key is building great ARCHIBUS Views, or AXVW files.  And so much of what makes this hard is getting the data that you need into the view.  I’m going to talk about 3 SQL tricks I’ve learned to make this process easier.

Queries Rather Than Tables

Many of the example queries you’ll see in ARCHIBUS views define datasources that connect directly to database tables.  This is useful, of course, but sometimes you need data from multiple tables, which is very difficult, or even impossible, to write a datasource that does this by just referring to the tables directly.

When this happens, it’s time to have the datasource refer to an SQL Query instead of to the tables themselves.   This gives you the opportunity to develop the query in another tool (like SQL Server Management Studio), so you can be sure you have the data right, and then embed the Query in your ARCHIBUS View.

Here is an example from a custom Energy Management View RSC built recently.  This was a BIG query.  I haven’t include the whole query, or all the columns we really used in the datasource definition, but you get the idea:

 

       <dataSource
id=”ds_waterChart” applyVpaRestrictions=”false”>
              <!– Define parameters for the
custom SQL query –>
              <parameter
name=”locationField” dataType=”verbatim”
value=”ctry_id”/>
              <parameter
name=”locationValue” dataType=”text”
value=””/>
              <parameter
name=”timePeriodFrom” dataType=”text”
value=””/>
              <parameter
name=”timePeriodTo” dataType=”text” value=””/>
              <!– Define a custom SQL query
that can be restricted by various location values –>
              <sql
dialect=”generic”>select
                           ‘Water Usage
Comparison’ water_usage_label,
                           ‘Water Cost
Comparison’ water_cost_label,
                           sum(case
                                  when
b.time_period like ‘2013-%’
                                  then   a.qty_volume * c.area_fraction
                                  else   0
                           end) base_usage_hcf
              from   bill_line_archive a
              join
                           bill_archive b
              on            a.bill_id
= b.bill_id
              join
                           rsc_primary_building
c
              on            b.bl_id
= c.primary_bl_id
              and           a.meterseq = c.meterseq
              join
                           bl d
              on            c.bl_id
= d.bl_id
              join
                           vn e
              on            a.vn_id
= e.vn_id
              where  b.bill_type_id = ‘WATER’
        </sql>
              <table
name=”bill_archive” role=”main”/>
              <field
name=”water_usage_label” dataType=”text”>
                     <title
translatable=”true”>Water Usage</title>
              </field>
              <field
name=”water_cost_label” dataType=”text”>
                     <title
translatable=”true”>Water Cost</title>
              </field>
              <field
name=”base_usage_hcf” dataType=”number” size=”12″
decimals=”2″>
                     <title
translatable=”true”>2013 Usage (HCF)</title>
              </field>
       </dataSource>

Use unions to write a few small queries instead of one GIGANTIC query.

Sometimes, writing even a query that can do EVERYTHING you need it to is frustratingly complex.  It is often easier to write a series of SMALLER queries that can be tied together with a UNION operator, where each query does part of the work.

For those not familiar with the SQL Union Clause, it is used to combine the result-set of two or more SELECT statements.  Each SELECT statement within the UNION must have the same number of columns.  The columns must also have similar data types.  Additionally, the columns in each SELECT statement must be in the same order.  As long as you follow these fairly simple rules, it’s easy to sew two queries together as though they were one, then embed the combined query in the SQL clause of an AXVW View.

A recent example was a view that was supposed to show the results of inspections, and to say whether these had passed, or failed.  But “Pass” or “Fail” wasn’t a value stored in the database; I needed to do some logic to decide for each row.

Rather than writing one query, I wrote two.  One that had logic to select all the “Pass” rows, and one to select all the “Fail” rows.  Then I used the “UNION” clause to join them up.  Much easier.

When complexity is high, and so is repetition, use a Database View.

I’m generally not a big fan of using Database Views in connection with the ARCHIBUS Application.  For those not familiar with database views (as opposed to ARCHIBUS Views, which is just another name for an AXVW file) see this link.  Basically an SQL View is a “virtual table,” a SQL query embedded in the database that queries can be written against.  The problem with Database Views is that you have something outside the AXVW that it is dependent on (the SQL View).  So any time you need to change the data that the AXVW is looking at, you need to change the SQL View.  And if you move the AXVW from environment to another, you have to remember to bring the SQL View along, too.

So when should you use one?  Well, sometimes you’ll find yourself using NEARLY the SAME complex SQL Query in several AXVW files, or the SAME SQL Query multiple times in the SAME AXVW file.  Changes to ALL these queries would be very time-consuming.  So in the long term, it’s simpler to store all this oft-repeated SQL logic in one place.  The SQL View.

Usually, a “.sql” text file containing the “CREATE VIEW” statement is made when you create the view.  To make it easier to maintain the view over the long haul, and to migrate it between environment, it’s a good idea to keep this file around.  If you don’t have a better system, it can be handy to add a comment to the AXVW that says “You need this view, too” and reference the text file used to create it.  And to keep thr .sql script for generating the view close, consider storing it with a name similar to the AXVW view in the same folder where the AXVW file lives on your system.  So if you view is “rsc_wr_update.axvw”, you might store the view-creating SQL script as “rsc_wr_update_vw.sql” in the same folder.


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Success Story: Macromedia Designs a Better Real Estate Strategy

What can ARCHIBUS do for you? Here is a success story*, provided by ARCHIBUS, featuring one of our clients.

Macromedia Designs a Better Real Estate Strategy

Visit almost any  Web site and you’ll see Macromedia’s work in  action. As supplier and supporter of Internet technologies such as ColdFusion®, Flash™, and  Dreamweaver®, the company’s products are essential to interactive, modern communication. Like many other technology companies, Macromedia has weathered its share of growth, consolidation, and acquisitions in recent years. But thanks to ARCHIBUS, Macromedia has used these changes to its advantage by strategically applying space usage information to the company’s real estate planning process. As a result, Macromedia has saved millions of dollars through thoughtful consolidation and helped provide a more comfortable working environment for its employees—all with an eye towards the future.

A Company in Flux

Jim Morgensen, Vice President of Real Estate, Facilities and Services arrived at Macromedia when the company still relied on planners making physical rounds of the buildings. “Macromedia was a growing company at the time, with lots of moves, adds, and changes taking place,” he says. Despite the company’s high-tech image, planners were walking the floors, counting cubes and the people in them— not a very reliable way to develop a strategic plan for a dynamic company. Morgensen had already seen the value of facilities management software at his previous job at Silicon Graphics, Inc. (SGI). There, he used ARCHIBUS to create space efficiencies, ultimately discovering that 6-7 percent of the company’s space was either vacant or underused.

Given  his experience  at SGI, Morgensen  was able to recommend  ARCHIBUS as a way to increase Macromedia’s space efficiency as well. “I was used to having tidy monthly reports from ARCHIBUS on vacancies and occupancies,” he says. “Instead, we had a set of floor plans and employee counts, but neither were accurate. We didn’t know whether a space was occupied by a temp, a consultant, or in those days, someone’s dog! By bringing in ARCHIBUS, optimizing our space became almost instantly easier.”

Consolidation Pays Off

Macromedia began by creating accurate, defensible reports on the company’s space and infrastructure usage. “Early on, ARCHIBUS helped us identify excess space and find ways to put it to better use. Now that the company is back into growth mode, it helps us proactively plan for our future needs,” says Morgensen. Having accurate occupancy figures paid off quickly. Following a business acquisition, Macromedia took on a lease obligation for a building in Massachusetts. “After evaluating how each business unit in the building was using space, we were able to consolidate operations from about 225,000 square feet to about 80,000 square feet and sublet the rest, resulting in cost avoidance of approximately $2 million a year,” says Morgensen.

Macromedia was able to consolidate its operations to a lesser extent in some of its San Francisco buildings—a laudable achievement in that heated real estate market. “With ARCHIBUS, we were able to plan contiguous space for employees and arrange for shared space and infrastructure—such as software engineering labs— bringing our total real estate costs down,” says Morgensen. “In addition to the revenue potential we realized from subletting space, we saved money by writing off the costs of our real estate and associated equipment that was under obligation.”

Employee Tracking

Morgensen and his team work with Macromedia’s Human Resources (HR) department to track how and where employees work and the resources they require. “We’ve linked personnel records in ARCHIBUS with HR’s PeopleSoft® records,” says Morgensen. “New hires and terminations are fed into  ARCHIBUS to maintain accurate occupancy and vacancy figures.” Macromedia manages its internal move process via the customized  “Quick Move Process” developed by ARCHIBUS Business Partner Robert Stephen Consulting, LLC. “Our space records have never been more accurate,” says Morgensen. And thanks to a nightly sync between ARCHIBUS and PeopleSoft that updates Macromedia’s internal people finder, Macromedia employees no longer need to wander aimlessly in search of a colleague’s desk.

Synchronization with HR records yields other benefits, too. For example, a customized table in ARCHIBUS developed by Macromedia’s ARCHIBUS Business Partner associates key cards, physical keys, parking, and any training an employee might have (such as EMT training), with each staff member. With these tools, it’s easy for Macromedia to identify what needs to be collected from a terminated employee, as well as the workstation and parking vacancies that will become available.

ARCHIBUS also helped the HR department get a handle on the number of remote workers at Macromedia. Comparing an ARCHIBUS occupancy report with an HR report on all employees generated an accurate count of remote workers. Today, HR uses this information to justify and develop initiatives, such as ergonomic programs, for telecommuters. Meanwhile, Morgensen and his team have a better sense of spaces that are only being used on a part-time basis. The ARCHIBUS AutoCAD® Overlay with Design Management application has proven to be a very valuable tool to Macromedia’s planners in communicating space availability to end users. Managers can view the entire floor where their team resides and better plan their own team adjacencies, as well as adjacencies with other departments.

Information Made Accessible

Macromedia also uses SpaceView, a product from Robert Stephen Consulting, LLC, which makes vacancy and occupancy figures available on-line. Automated AutoLisp routines create the DWF files each night, so data is always up-to-date. A Data Condo™ from ARCHIBUS Business Partner AssistGlobal acts as a reliable Application Service Provider (ASP) for  Macromedia. “The Data Condo works really well, keeping our system running smoothly without requiring a lot of time and resources from our IT department,” says Morgensen.

As the company whittles down its real estate needs, Macromedia will soon handle its own lease administration services with the help of the ARCHIBUS Real Property & Lease Management application. And the new headquarters building that the company recently purchased will be an opportunity to implement the work order features of the ARCHIBUS Building Operations Management application. For all the future goals the implementation holds, Morgensen is still sold on the value of ARCHIBUS for optimizing the company’s use of its space. “The greatest value is that we can plan with certainty,” he says. “We can project growth and know precisely the amount of space and infrastructure  we’ll need. ARCHIBUS gives us a better way to measure our requirements and apply this knowledge to our real estate envelope.”

Vital Statistics

Organization: Macromedia

Location: San Francisco, California

Facilities Facts: 30 buildings worldwide measuring approximately 1 million square feet; 90% managed with ARCHIBUS

ARCHIBUS Applications: 

  • Space Management
  • Overlay for AutoCAD with Design Management
  • Furniture & Equipment Management

3rd Party Applications:

  • Space View from Robert Stephen Consulting; Data
  • Condo from AssistGlobal

Impetus for Implementation: Needed a system to maintain accurate space usage figures

Benefits Gained: Cost savings and avoidance of approximately $2 million per year due to consolidation; accurate occupancy figures enable enhanced strategic real estate decisions; integration with employee information leads to more relevant Human Resources programs

Future Plans: Bring lease administration in- house; add work order management functionality to owned buildings; track all telecommunications and cable infrastructure

ARCHIBUS Integration: PeopleSoft

Business Partners: Robert Stephen Consulting, LLC; AssistGlobal

Web Site: www.macromedia.com

*This entire article was written and provided by ARCHIBUS.


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Bob Stephen’s Top 10 Business Books: #1 “Delivering Happiness”

This is part 1 of a 10 part series by RSC’s CEO & Managing Director, Bob Stephen. In this series, Bob discusses the top 10 business books in his library.

Why every CEO should read “Delivering Happiness”

First, let me ask you a few questions: What is the value of joy in your work? How much does it matter that you, your employees, and your customer’s are happy? Why is it that the amount of money one makes tends to have a negative correlation with how happy they are? If you’ve ever found yourself thinking along these lines, then it is imperative you read Tony Hsieh’s book, “Delivering Happiness.”

Hsieh is the well-known entrepreneur and current CEO of Zappos. In
“Delivering Happiness,” Hsieh discusses a few of his highly successful
and profitable business ventures. More specifically he discusses the
impact those businesses had on his overall happiness. When the time came
to sell, he could have made exponentially more than the millions he did
– but the money didn’t matter to him. He was completely and entirely
unhappy.

Building Your Own Happiness

Hsieh founded Zappos on one essential principle: happiness. He made the key decision to surround himself with energetic, enthusiastic, likeable, and service-oriented people who in turn helped him create a positive
and uplifting culture. The organization developed a set of core values that created an atmosphere of optimism and success. Hsieh made sure that every employee knew they were a valued member of the team.

Sharing Your Happiness

It really stuck with me the importance Hsieh put on an internal culture
of happiness and positivity. But what caught my attention even more, is
his desire to share that happiness.

As the company grew, that happiness Hsieh worked so hard to establish
spilled beyond the doors of the organization. They shared that same
positivity to their clients through their customer service.

There are a plethora of service oriented professions who don’t hold themselves to the same standards Hsieh established at Zappos. For example: In the book Hsieh shares a story about a particular customer. This customer came back to their hotel late one night and called into room service for a pizza. The hotel staff quickly informed them that
their kitchen was closed for the evening and they could not fulfill the
request. The customer responded asking the hotel employee to promptly
call Zappos and have them send him a pizza. Exasperated, the hotel
employee followed through with the request. To her amazement, the
customer service representative at Zappo’s got their location, and
reported back with 5 pizza delivery services that were open and would
deliver directly to the hotel room and asked what type of pizza they
would like.

Happiness Delivered

My point in sharing all this is that both the traveler and hotel
employee are now loyal Zappo’s customers. Because Hsieh built his
business on the principles of happiness and delivering joy to his
customers, he is wildly successful. But his success exceeds the numbers
on his paycheck. The true success of Zappos is the happiness and the
satisfaction Hsieh now has in his job.

What it boils down to is this: When you are happy, your staff is happy.
When your staff is happy, your clients are happy. This cycle of
happiness creates an atmosphere of productivity. People who love their
job work hard at it. When they work hard they get more work done and do
their jobs better.

I highly recommend this book and I urge you to add it to your
library. Hsieh was able to put into words something I have been
searching to describe throughout my entire business career. We all want
to provide that level of customer service. We all want to love where we
work, what we do, and be able to deliver a product or service that
changes other’s lives for the better.


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Conversations with Bob: Why is IWMS Essential Today?

 

Megan: I’ve seen a lot of articles about how IWMS is a break through technology and now more than ever, with the way corporate real estate and facilities management is growing and changing, that IWMS is essential to a successful business. What are your thoughts on that?

Bob: I absolutely agree. Today’s world is changing. The U.S. used to be a global financial area as well as Japan and Europe but the world is now becoming a global economy. With technology, people can work from anywhere at anytime. We’re a virtual company. All my staff either work on site or at home. Larger companies are starting to have their staff work remotely. Understanding where groups of people are, how much square footage you have, and how much you actually need is imperative in today’s fast changing world. You begin to understand that what used to be the norm of 250 sq. ft. per person which included the common area and their office now is down, in some companies, to 50 or 60 sq. ft. per person. Why? Simply because the person isn’t there all the time. They can work from home. They’re on the road. All you really need is a desk to touchdown. They don’t actually need a space to put a picture of their family, they’ve got it on their phone or their laptop. These systems allow companies to reduce their geographic footprint as far as physical buildings go, but to still understand what they need for the amount of staff they have and where their staff are. I’ve also done things like heat maps. In London I have three satellite offices and there are 35 employees. Doesn’t it make sense for us to consolidate that into one floor and not have three satellites and pay three leases but bring them into one and only pay one lease? It really helps them to make strategic decisions like that.


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Thoughts? Questions? Comment below and let us know what you think! We’d love to hear your insights.

Conversations with Bob: Why is IWMS essential today?

 

Megan: I’ve seen a lot of articles about how IWMS is a break through technology and now more than ever, with the way corporate real estate and facilities management is growing and changing, that IWMS is essential to a successful business. What are your thoughts on that?

 

Bob: I absolutely agree. Today’s world is changing. The U.S. used to be a global financial area as well as Japan and Europe but the world is now becoming a global economy. With technology, people can work from anywhere at anytime. We’re a virtual company. All my staff either work on site or at home. Larger companies are starting to have their staff work remotely. Understanding where groups of people are, how much square footage you have, and how much you actually need is imperative in today’s fast changing world. You begin to understand that what used to be the norm of 250 sq. ft. per person which included the common area and their office now is down, in some companies, to 50 or 60 sq. ft. per person. Why? Simply because the person isn’t there all the time. They can work from home. They’re on the road. All you really need is a desk to touchdown. They don’t actually need a space to put a picture of their family, they’ve got it on their phone or their laptop. These systems allow companies to reduce their geographic footprint as far as physical buildings go, but to still understand what they need for the amount of staff they have and where their staff are.  I’ve also done things like heat maps. In London I have three satellite offices and there are 35 employees. Doesn’t it make sense for us to consolidate that into one floor and not have three satellites and pay three leases but bring them into one and only pay one lease? It really helps them to make strategic decisions like that.

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5 Things a CEO Can Learn From Vistage: Pt. 1 — Becoming a Confident Leader

This week we are excited to bring to you a part 1 of a new series on The Five Things a CEO Can Learn From Vistage: Becoming a Confident Leader

Several years ago, I found myself extremely frustrated.  It didn’t seem as though I was getting the results I wanted from my staff.  After expressing this irritation and disappointment to the head of Human Resources, she recommended I join Vistage. Vistage is a premiere CEO coaching group.  After looking into it, I figured it was worth a shot.
After joining the program, I quickly felt weights being lifted. Things got clearer, easier, and better.  I felt as though I’d gone from navigating vicious, stormy seas in a tiny boat to sailing on a calm, serene lake.  About six months into coaching, Lance Descourouez asked me a life changing question:

Are You an Accomplished Leader?

“Bob,” he posed, “Do you consider yourself to be an accomplished CEO?”

My immediate, gut reaction was an emphatic, “No.” Lance prompted me to think more deeply about his question, but even after several minutes, my answer remained the same.  No, I did not feel like an accomplished CEO. Thankfully, Lance provided some follow up questions, sparking an epiphany. He asked:

 

    1. How long have you been in business?

At the time, it was 14 years.

    1. What’s your yearly revenue?

It was well north of seven figures.

    1. How many people do you employ?

There were 15-16 people on payroll at the time.

    1. Has the business survived any recessions?

Two, actually.

Lance then repeated his initial question: “Bob, do you consider yourself to be an accomplished CEO?”

Confidence Is Key

I’d been so busy looking at my goals that I’d neglected to look at the journey. I couldn’t see the forest through the trees. I couldn’t see that I was, in fact, a successful CEO. I accomplished more in those 14 years than most others do in a lifetime.

Then it hit me – I’d lost my confidence. That interaction helped restore it as well as my sense of direction. The transformation from uncertain and doubting to a fearless, self assured CEO was drastic. I felt like a caterpillar breaking free from my chrysalis.

Now, my purpose in telling the story is this: every leader has these kinds of doubts at one time or another. It is normal. But it is vital not to let those doubts break you or weigh you down.Confident and accomplished leaders are born by remembering who we are, where we were, and how far we’ve come.

That is why, as leaders, we need the support of good friends and coaches to help us keep our minds in the game. We need people who can help us own-up to our fears, answer the hard questions, and move forward with direction. We need people who’ve been there before, so they can help guide us through the dark times. Vistage is that support group.


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Robert Stephen Consulting, LLC Re-brands to RSC

Press Release:

Robert Stephen Consulting, LLC Re-brands to RSC

SAN RAMON, CA – (December 31, 2015) – Robert Stephen Consulting, LLC, a San Ramon-based consulting provider, recently re-branded and unveiled a redesigned website. Founded in February of 2000 by Robert Stephen, RSC is a private Enterprise Asset Management (EAM), Integrated Workplace Management System (IWMS), and Computer Aided Facilities Management (CAFM) consulting firm located in San Ramon and Los Angeles, California and Phoenix, Arizona, and Salt Lake City, Utah.

RSC works closely with client staff, interior designers, AutoCAD designers and drafters, lease management and furniture warehousing companies to facilitate a fully integrated relational database containing precise and key information for corporate real estate and facilities reporting needs. Some of the applications used by RSC include web tools utilizing dynamic queries, EAM, IWMS, and CAFM software such as ARCHIBUS, and most web reporting tools.

RSC’s re-branding was prompted by our growth.  As RSC moved into multiple states and several markets the need for a company image that extended beyond its founder was required.  “We are excited about this positioning. Our culture and innovations allow us attract top talent and compete with the best consulting firms.” Says Bob Stephen, RSC CEO.

The redesigned RSC logo and website presents a modern look utilizing a responsive and simple-navigation design. “Drawing attention to our strengths was one of the driving forces to the re-brand,” said Bob Stephen, RSC CEO. “RSC is known for its fast, reliable, solid consulting skills.  Our  website brings that to the forefront.”

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